SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATH (STEM)

At Bridgton Academy, we recognize the need for all students to have some appreciation for the wonders of science and technology, and sufficient knowledge of engineering to engage in public discussions on related issues and to understand technological information as it relates to their everyday lives. In addition, our students must acquire the skills to be successful in college in order to enter careers of their choice, including the possibility of careers in science, engineering or technology. Too few workers in the United States currently have the background to enter these fields, and many citizens lack even fundamental knowledge of them. Bridgton Academy’s STEM department offers a wide array of courses in all the STEM areas. Instructors in these disciplines design lessons around common math, science, and engineering core practices to allow students to make connections across these disciplines in order to cultivate scientific habits of mind and to understand how engineering and technologically-based solutions are developed.

MATHEMATICS

All math courses are full-year, two-semester offerings

GEOMETRY
This is a full-year course. This course includes a review of algebra skills and a study of Euclidian geometry. Problem-solving strategies are emphasized, and relationships between algebra and geometry are explored, but the main emphasis of the course is on traditional topics in geometry.

ADVANCED ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY
This is a full-year course. The course begins with a first quarter review of Algebra. Topics will include: patterns and expressions, properties of and operations with real numbers, algebraic expressions, operations with polynomials including expansion and factoring, solving linear algebraic equations and inequalities, modeling with linear equations and graphing.

The second quarter will begin with an introduction to functions and their graphs, including combinations of functions, inverse functions, quadratic and polynomial equations, and rational equations.

During the second semester, exponential and logarithmic equations and the properties of logarithms, and multivariable systems of equations and inequalities will be explored.

Additionally, an introductory study of trigonometry will be covered, including right and non-right triangle trigonometry, trigonometric functions and their application to periodic phenomena.

STATISTICS (CAP)
This is a full-year course. To ensure students have the necessary mathematical background to be successful in this course, the course begins with a review of algebra during the first quarter. Topics will include: Properties of and operations with real numbers, algebraic expressions, operations with polynomials including expansion and factoring, solving linear algebraic equations and inequalities, modeling with linear equations and graphing. The probability and statistics portion of this course begins during the second quarter. It is designed to acquaint students with statistical methods of data analysis. Topics include: descriptive statistics; probability and probability distributions; hypothesis testing and statistical inference; analysis of variance; and regression. Successful completion of this course may qualify a student for college credit through the University of Southern Maine.

PRECALCULUS (CAP)
This is a full-year course. This course provides the mathematical background necessary for calculus. Topics include: equations and inequalities; functions and graphs; exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; and identities and inverse functions. Successful completion of this course (the equivalent of MAT 180 at University of New England) may qualify a student for 3 hours of college credit. Students are required to use a TI 89 Titanium or TI Nspire CX CAS graphing calculator. Students are strongly urged to purchase their calculators prior to arrival at Bridgton.

CALCULUS (CAP)
This is a full-year course. This course is modeled on a college freshman calculus course taught at University of Southern Maine (USM). The topics include: analytical geometry; functions; continuity; limits; derivatives and applications; and integrals and applications. This course is the equivalent of USM’s MAT 152D and carries 4 college credits. Students are required to use a TI 89 Titanium or TI Nspire CX CAS graphing calculator. Students are strongly urged to purchase their calculators prior to arrival at Bridgton.

ACCELERATED CALCULUS (CAP)
This is a full-year course. This course parallels the two-semester sequence course taught at University of Southern Maine, Calculus A (MAT 152D) and B (MAT 153), for 4 credit hours for each semester. Students are required to use a TI 89 Titanium or TI Nspire CX CAS graphing calculator. Students are strongly urged to purchase their calculators prior to arrival at Bridgton.

SCIENCE/COMPUTER SCIENCE

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
This is a full-year course. Anatomy and Physiology is an introductory level course in the human sciences that includes examination of the following areas: cytology, histology, genetics, and the major systems of the body. The object of this course is to give each student a basic, working knowledge of the human body’s parts and how this anatomy functions to create the living condition. Anatomy and Physiology is a lab class and includes a dissection lab. Practical application of the scientific knowledge is stressed.

CELLS, GENES, AND BIOTECHNOLOGY (CAP)
This single-semester science elective provides an understanding of the kinds of questions that science can and cannot address, while exploring topics in cellular biology, the structure and function of genes, and biotechnology. Discussions probe the bioethical implications of our growing knowledge and application of technologies involving manipulation of cellular and genetic processes. Also includes experiences in a laboratory setting to conduct basic experiments that elucidate the structure of cells and the function of genes. This college level course should NOT be your first course in Biology. A strong high school science background is recommended. Successful completion of this course qualifies a student for three (3) hours of transferable college credit from Plymouth State University.

*DIGITAL MEDIA (CAP)
This one-semester computer science course introduces students to the creation, acquisition, editing, and delivery of computer-generated media. Work includes graphics, photography, sound, music, video, and interactive hypermedia. Students will use a range of tools to acquire, manipulate, and store their original content. The equivalent of CO 110 at St. Joseph’s College, this course carries 4 credit hours for successful completion.

*INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING
In this semester-long course, students will begin to learn the Python programming language. The language does not require much setup for simple programs, but can scale to run some of the largest programming projects in the world. Initially we will learn the basics of the language, but then we will apply our knowledge to several projects.

ECOLOGY OF THE LAKES REGION
Ecology is the scientific study of the relationships between organisms and their environment. Ecological systems such as forests and lakes are like complicated machines. Ecologists study the components of these systems to understand how the pieces fit together and how the systems function as a whole. Ecology of the Lakes Region is an introductory course that will explore the basic concepts in ecology and look at the ecological relationships that comprise the local environment that is the Lakes Region.

*NORTHERN FIELD STUDIES
Northern Forest Field Studies is not your traditional science class. Instead of teaching science with test tubes and thermometers, we use maps, compasses, and bows and arrows. is course is designed to change young people’s lives forever by exposing them to the wonders of the natural world and the many great opportunities to be experienced in the outdoors. Students are taught life-long skills by using an integrated curriculum of science, math, some writing, and critical thinking skills. Class meeting times will allow the introduction and exploration of new topics, followed up by various outdoor experiences. Ultimately, the mission of this class is to instill in every student through a hands-on, real-world curriculum.

*PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN NUTRITION
Nutrition is a one-semester elective that covers the scientific principles of human nutrition in maintaining health and preventing disease. Nutrient requirements of the human body, biochemical functions, and interrelationships of nutrients are examined. Athletes learn how to fuel their bodies for building muscle, optimal sports performance, and for general health and well-being. Nutritional misconceptions and controversies are evaluated using readings, discussions, and hands-on lab experiences.

*ADVANCED HUMAN NUTRITION (CAP)
This year-long, college-level nutrition course focuses on the interrelationship between nutritional practices and human physical performance in sports and fitness. Topics covered include the role of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals and water on both everyday eating and physical performance. This course provides a foundational science background in chemistry, anatomy and physiology, and microbiology in the context of human nutrition, as well as hands-on lab experiences. This course carries four hours of credit, upon successful completion, from St. Joseph’s college.

INTRODUCTION TO METEOROLOGY
This is an introductory course that explores the composition, structure and physical properties of the Earth’s atmosphere. Weather phenomena will be studied on both the global and local scale. Major topics include heat balance, atmospheric stability, precipitation processes, cyclonic activity, weather analysis, and very basic weather forecasting techniques. Particular attention will be paid to the causes, structure and impact of tornadoes, hurricanes, thunderstorms and other severe weather systems.

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